NaNoWriMotivation

Last year, I made a half-willed attempt to write a novel in one month. Only two things of substance came of this. The first was the most amazing introduction to a novel ever to spill out of my brain. The second was this blog entry, which now serves as a reminder of where I went wrong:

Originally posted on November 29, 2011

Okay, so tonight marks the end of NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month). If you recall, at the beginning of the month, I proclaimed that I would, in fact, complete a novel in one month.

Well.

Things didn’t really work out as planned.

This is how it happened (in a tribute to Hyperbole and a Half):

The first day, I was so excited and ready for the challenge. The sun was shinning. The birds were chirping. The writer’s muse slipped me a note with the perfect idea for a story.

Yay! I’m going to write my face off!!

After careful consideration of the amount of writing I had to do, I mapped out my time on a calendar and pinned it up on my wall.

I just have to write for 46 hours a day. Perfect!

That night same night I outlined my story by hand in my writer’s notebook. It had a title, a beginning, and a middle. I didn’t have an ending, but, according to my calendar, I didn’t have to worry about that until November 21st.

Day three. I’m full of words.

On the third day of the  month I began writing. I wrote amazing words. I read some out loud to The Librarian and she actually laughed. Like a real laugh. She never laughs. Well. She never laughs at anything I say.

The Librarian likes it? Holy crap, this is a best-seller!

I became obsessed with the intro. Writing and rewriting. Drafting and deleting. Thinking and sketching. And then I did a little math. I’m not sure why. I hated math while I was in school and majored in English so I wouldn’t have to ever do it again as an adult. But, there I was, computing how many words I needed to write per day to make it to my 50,000-word goal.

I’m pretty sure I need to place a decimal point somewhere.

And, when I finished my algorithm I realized that a.) I was a mathematical genius. and b.) I was 10,000 words behind. I did some more computing and further discovered that I needed to write 4,000 words a day to make it to the finish line. Then, after all that math, I noticed that the official NaNoWriMo website did those calculations for you.

Great. Now math and writing make me sad.

Feeling defeated, I gave myself a few days to recover from the math I never should have performed. And then, a few days turned into a week. The week turned into two. And then there was a Lady Gaga Thanksgiving special.

I’m going to write right after this.

I never got around to writing after that. I mean, did you see it? Who could write after that?

Tonight, however, I feel like that first day. I feel like I could sit down and type until my fingers bleed. And, c’mon, isn’t it a bigger accomplishment to write a novel in one night than in one month? I think so.

Okay, so let’s see, I need to write 45,000 words in eight hours, which means 6,000 words an hour…where’s my calculator?

‘Twas the night before the deadline.

Twas the night before the deadline

Okay, so tonight marks the end of NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month). If you recall, at the beginning of the month, I proclaimed that I would, in fact, complete a novel in one month.

Well.

Things didn’t really work out as planned.

This is how it happened (in a tribute to Hyperbole and a Half):

The first day, I was so excited and ready for the challenge. The sun was shinning. The birds were chirping. The writer’s muse slipped me a note with the perfect idea for a story.

Yay! I'm going to write my face off!!

After careful consideration of the amount of writing I had to do, I mapped out my time on a calendar and pinned it up on my wall.

I just have to write for 46 hours a day. Perfect!

That night same night I outlined my story by hand in my writer’s notebook. It had a title, a beginning, and a middle. I didn’t have an ending, but, according to my calendar, I didn’t have to worry about that until November 21st.

Day three. I'm full of words.

On the third day of the  month I began writing. I wrote amazing words. I read some out loud to The Librarian and she actually laughed. Like a real laugh. She never laughs. Well. She never laughs at anything I say.

The Librarian likes it? Holy crap, this is a best-seller!

I became obsessed with the intro. Writing and rewriting. Drafting and deleting. Thinking and sketching. And then I did a little math. I’m not sure why. I hated math while I was in school and majored in English so I wouldn’t have to ever do it again as an adult. But, there I was, computing how many words I needed to write per day to make it to my 50,000-word goal.

I'm pretty sure I need to place a decimal point somewhere.

And, when I finished my algorithm I realized that a.) I was a mathematical genius. and b.) I was 10,000 words behind. I did some more computing and further discovered that I needed to write 4,000 words a day to make it to the finish line. Then, after all that math, I noticed that the official NaNoWriMo website did those calculations for you.

Great. Now math and writing make me sad.

Feeling defeated, I gave myself a few days to recover from the math I never should have performed. And then, a few days turned into a week. The week turned into two. And then there was a Lady Gaga Thanksgiving special.

I'm going to write right after this.

I never got around to writing after that. I mean, did you see it? Who could write after that?

Tonight, however, I feel like that first day. I feel like I could sit down and type until my fingers bleed. And, c’mon, isn’t it a bigger accomplishment to write a novel in one night than in one month? I think so.

Okay, so let’s see, I need to write 45,000 words in eight hours, which means 6,000 words an hour…where’s my calculator?

'Twas the night before the deadline.

I’m gonna be (50,000 words)

Today kicks off National Novel Writing Month, better known as NaNoWriMo, which is a horrible pseudo-acronym. I can only imagine it came about because everyone that participates in the main event is in a huge hurry. The deal is you have to write a 50,000-word novel in 30 days. Crazy, right? Which is why I’m doing it. In order to make it to the finish, I have to average a little under 1700 words per day. Or, what is more likely to happen, 50,000 words on the last night of the month. Either way, here goes…